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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 668 (some duplicates have been removed)
with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like y
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: christmas eve shootings killed two firefighters in rochester, new york and a policeman and bystander in houston, texas. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the killings, coming ten days after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. >> brown: then, we turn to egypt, and accusations of voting fraud in the referendum for a new constitution. we talk with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate
here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again to
>> brown: then, margaret warner looks at the political strife in egypt, after deadly clashes in the streets and resignations by top officials. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology,
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, paul solman breaks down the latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killing 27 people including the country's head of border security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a so
. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to
at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more people found work in november and more people stopped looking for work. as a result, the number of new jobs came in better than expected today and the rate of unemployment was the lowest s
. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >>
blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your p
regulation. >> how much has the inve investigation tarnished murdock? >> chris brown got into a twitter car over the weekend. >> some really degrading comments from chris brown who really needs to learn how to avoid these kinds of things. >> why does a man who beat up his girlfriend have 11 million followers? >>> sometimes rummors turn out o be true. jeff zucker was the logical choice so it was hardly a shock when he got the job. he talked about the cable news wars and why his cable outlet was moving left in an interview two years ago with charlie rose. >> i think i've always encouraged our folks to watch fox news and learn frp it. nobody should hold their nose. >> is that the reason msnbc decided it's in our interest and future to make sure that we get people like keith oberman who can play in his arena with the same kind of passion they play in their arena? >> i think what you learn in the cable news and information world is that news and information is ubiquitous. >> he didn't minimize the challenge he face at cnn. what does he bring to the job and in what direction should he take the ne
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama and congressional leaders met face to face for the first time in weeks, in a last-ditch effort to avert the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on the chances for a breakthrough-- just four days before automatic tax hikes and spending cuts hit. >> brown: then, we turn to india. ray suarez looks at the violent protests and public anger sparked by the gang rape of a young woman. >> warner: john merrow has the story of a group of california charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's
charges of money laundering for the nation of iran and mexican drug cartels. >> suarez: jeffrey brown profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more people can do so, then we can change the society. >> woodruff: and we look at what the federal trade commission calls a "digital danger zone," mobile applications that gather data about children. >> what needs to be done is a way for parents to easily at any time see exactly what's being collected and who they are sharing that information with. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcast
. >>> good morning, everybody. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. this morning the lines of communication are open, but time is running out for a resolution to the impending fiscal cliff. president obama and house speaker john boehner met behind closed doors sunday. it was their first face-to-face meeting since november 6, the election day, and now it look like some republicans may be breaking ranks. susan mcginnis is in washington with the latest. hi, susan. good morning to you. >> hi. many on capitol hill are encouraged by the weekend talks, but to get a deal done on time, apparently action this week is said to be critical. and now we have the president heading out on the road again. president obama leaves d.c. today, headed to michigan to talk to auto workers, part of his strategy to generate public support for his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff, the tax hikes and spending cuts due to kick in at year end. the president and house speaker john boehner met one on one at the white house on sunday. while no details were leaked, a rarity for washington, we do know the main s
mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arr
arrest after a car crash that killed his teammate jerry brown. brown was just 25 years old. he was a member of the cowboys' practice squad. dominique is live in l.a. with the latest. dominique? >> hi, rick. jerry brown was a practice squad line backer. he was killed in the one-car accident around 2:20 in the morning in the dallas suburb of irving. his teammate josh brent was behind the wheel, and just the two of them were in the vehicle. the police department described how the accident unfolded. >> it appears as if he was traveling at a high rate of speed at which time his vehicle touched or impacted the outside curb of the service road causing his vehicle to flip at least one time. the vehicle ultimately came to rest on its top once it slid back into the roadway and came to rest in the center of the service road. >> they say brown pictured here during his college days was found unresponsive at the scene and once he got to the hospital he was pronounced dead. it was supposed that they were drinking at a gentleman's club, but police were unable to confirm that. >> our officers o
are looking for 27-year-old javon foster, boyfriend of selena brown. police say the bullets grazed her 2-year-old daughter. we're told the baby is recovering in the hospital and expected to be okay. news4's pat collins spoke with the victim's family. >>> today d.c. revealed the possible new color choices for taxi cabs in the city. mayor gray and the taxicab commission want the cabs in d.c. to have the same look. at the convention center, they showed off some of the possible color schemes. the public is able to vote on their favorite. coming up at 5:00, tom sherwood shows us why cabs may not end up being any of these colors at all. they do get your attention. >> they sure do. >> gray is the color of the day today, damp all day long. >> we're looking for things to clear up. the question is when? meteorologist veronica johnson. >> hey there, guys, we'll have to wait a while before we see any clearing. of course, it has been damp today, as a matter of fact we've been running some 10 to 15 degrees above average with a gray sky and damp weather throughout. of cour, this morning we had quite a bit o
with illinois governor pat quinn among others. >> ifill: then, jeffrey brown examines a new report blaming the state department for systemic failures in security at the diplomatic mission in benghazi, libya, where four americans died. >> woruff: from damascus, i.t.n.'s alex thomson reports on the impact the rebel siege of the syrian capital is having on supporters of the assad regime. >> in this educational district and the one next door alone, in the past two weeks 35 small children and two teachers have been killed. >> ifill: we sit down with retiring connecticut senator joe lieberman, the democrat turned independent reflects on the tragedy in his home state and his 24 years in u.s. senate. >> there is reason for people to be angry skeptical and cynical about t willingss or capacity of congress to act or stop mass violence in our country. >> woodruff: and kwame holman remembers conservative jurist former solicitor general and failed supreme court nominee robert h. bork. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supp
brown. we begin with negotiations to avert the so-called fiscal cliff both republicans and white house hold their lines and no formal talks yesterday. president obama said he wasn't ruling out some reductions in entitlement programs such as medicare and social security, meanwhile house speaker john boehner has to win over hard liners in his own party. susan mcginnis is following it all. >> reporter: hi. good morning. there are some glimmers of common ground here among the two sides that could form the basis of a deal. the president is now talking about actually lowering the tax rate for the top 2% not now but later. and republicans are now taking some heat over their latest plan a lot of it from within their own party. >> five, four -- >> reporter: house speaker john boehner led the countdown to the lighting of the capitol hill christmas tree last night. >> one. >> reporter: but a different countdown weighs on the minds of these lawmakers, the countdown to the fiscal cliff. a series of tax increases and spending cuts due to kick in at the end the year. >> god bless us, everyone. >> rep
charged with manslaughter after he flipped his car in an accident that killed teammate jerry brown. it's the second time in a week there's been a tragedy involving an nfl player. here's the details. reporter: early saturday morning, josh brent was speeding on a service road in a dallas suburb when his vehicle hit a curb and flipped. >> our initial indication is that when officers arrived on scene, mr. brent was removing -- dragging mr. brown from the vehicle. i should also point out that the vehicle actually did catch on fire. >> the passenger, brent's cowboys teammate, 25-year-old jerry brown, was pronounced dead at the hospital. brent was initially arrested on suspicion of drunk driving after failing a sobriety test and after brown died, that charge was upgraded to intoxication manslaughter. cowboys owner jerry jones issued a statement saying, we are deeply saddened by the news of this accident and the passing of jerry brown. at this time our hearts and prayers and deepest simple this are with the members of jerry's family and all those who knew him and loved him. this incident comes
brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block. new recruits coming out of the police academy, they all went there. they all went there, teams of
-vehicle accident early this morning which killed the lone passenger cowboys teammate jerry brown, a member of the practice squad. irving, texas police spokesman had this to say early today. >> mr. price brent was asked to perform some field sobriety tests. after he performed those field sobriety tests based on his performance of those tests along with our officers' observations and the conversations that they had with him, he was placed under arrest for driving while intoxicated. once our officers learned that mr. brown had passed away then mr. price brent was under arrest for intoxication manslaughter. >> tim: brent and brown were teammates at the university of illinois. brent was suspended from the illini team in 2009 after a d.u.i. arrest. he was sentenced to 60 days in jail. 200 hours of community service and two years probation for that offense. his current charge is a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years of imprisonment and a fine of up to $10,000. "the nfl today" will have more on this tragic story tomorrow. turning back to army-navy,
news" for tuesday, december 18, 2012. >> good morning, everyone, good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. most of the schools in newtown, connecticut, reopen today. sandy hook elementary remains an active crime scene. the site of friday's deadly shootings will remain closed indefinitely. 26 people including 20 young children were killed there. authorities hope to soon interview two survivors of the massacre. funerals, more of them, are scheduled for today. james mattioli was 6. his family says he loved sports, was a numbers guy, and best friends with his older sister. jessica rekos, also 6, loved everything about horses. she read about them, drew them, wrote about them, for christmas she wanted cowgirl boots. we have more. >> reporter: good morning. it's a rainy and somber morning in newtown where families have begun to lay their dead to rest, and more funerals are scheduled for days to come. it's back to school today for the children of newtown, connecticut, with one exception -- students of sandy hook elementary. kenneth canfield is a fourth grader at sandy hook. he was there that trag
:00, the brother of former d.c. council chair kwame brown plans to plead guilty in federal court. today prosecutors formally charged shea brown with bank fraud and sources say that plea deal could include jail time. shea brown operated his brother's kwame's campaign. >>> tonight a local woman may have to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages for what she said on the internet. >> reporter: i'm bruce leshan in fairfax where a judge today ordered a woman to take back at least part of her online review of her contractor. >> good people do prevail. it's very, very hatchet. >> reporter: contractor christopher dietz crowing outside the courthouse after winning a preliminary injunction against a former customer who wrote a series of scathing online reviews. >> what she put up there were pure lies. >> reporter: jane perez said she never imagined her reviews on yelp and angie's list would land her in court facing thousands of dollars in legal fees and potentially hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages for defamation. she'd hired dietz to install a toilet, but when things went south, she wro
browne. and i met him at an underground boxing match. he said the first rule was i wasn't allowed to talk about it, but i guess i just did. it is imus in the morning producer. filling in is billy, star of stage and screen, billy zane. he deserves that. and he once showed up outside my bedroom window with a boom box over his head playing peter gabriel's "in your eyes" and we have been friends ever since. he is the host of the opie and anthony show. >> is it better to be born in the city of burn? according to a report switzerland will be the best place for a baby entering the world in 2013. the u.s., a dismal 16th on the list. a long fall for america which was ranked first in 1988. the economist intelligence unit aimes to measure which country will provide the best opportunities for healthy, safe and prosperous lives ahead. 1k3* the winner of this year's lottery of life are wee ones births in switzerland, australia, norway, sweden and denmark. which i am sure are one country. this thing is already very suspect. the economist says the index was compiled using 11 statistically ipped caters no
brown thing where the arkansas church awas attacked for putting on a play called merry christmas charlie brown. i didn't know this did you know charlie brown was a rabbi? >> where did you get that from? >> bill: i just made it up because this is so absurd that that would be the only reason that you would have to ban because then charlie brown would be a religious figure. >> the united states supreme court would say that's not the establishment of a particular religion. all i know is carlson is every day i come to work and i see attacks on judeo-christian tradition. >> see them because we listen now to the less than 1% in society majority of people who have enjoyed it for their lifetime. i don't remember these complaints when i was growing up. i don't remember any of them. and now what will my children be fighting for? what will my children -- they already -- we already have to as i have told you before, i kind of have to say hey, look, way in the backseat, way off beyond in the yonder you can see baby jesus maybe if there is a nativity scene anywhere. this is what we are doing now. we ar
to turkey, as fears grow that syrian chemical weapons could cross the border. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown talks to mcclatchy newspapers' egypt correspondent nancy youssef about the massive antigovernment protests in cairo today. >> ifill: we continue our series of conversations about the fiscal cliff. tonight we hear from economist paul krugman. >> i don't think there's going to be much of a deal. i think there's going to be a kind of... there will be an outcome. >> woodruff: from haiti, fred de sam lazaro reports on the efforts to stem a deadly cholera epidemic that began after the 2010 earthquake. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks to author and journalist tom ricks about what he describes as the decline of american military leadership. >> today nobody gets credit for anything and mediocrity is accepted as a core value in the performance of generals. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the id
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 668 (some duplicates have been removed)

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